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Photo by Jon Sailer on Unsplash

Now that the election is over, let’s look at what we’ve learned and what we can expect for the coming year. In short: The election wasn’t close, Biden’s cabinet is going to be really bad, and everyone will be miserable.

It Wasn’t That Close

From following the election returns, it seemed like Biden had been poised to win by a landslide, but instead he only won by a nailbiter. Doesn’t that mean the polls were massively off, again?

No. Biden had been leading by about 10 points in October, and by November that lead had dwindled to about 8 points. As of this writing, Biden’s overall lead in the popular vote is about 4 percent, and likely to grow more as states like California process more mail in ballots. So Biden will end up winning by about 4–5 percent, meaning the polls were off by about 3–4 percent. Polls usually have a margin of error of 3 percent, so this isn’t that big of a miss. It’s also important to remember Biden’s win is larger than Obama’s win over Romney in 2012, or Bush’s win over Kerry in 2004. …


What will happen if the Supreme Court kills Roe v Wade?

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Photo by Maria Oswalt on Unsplash

Now that Amey Coney Barret is being confirmed, there is now a chance that Roe v Wade, the Supreme Court precedent protecting abortion rights, will be overturned. Let’s go into the likelihood that this comes to pass, the legal mechanics of abortion access, and the real-world consequences this would have.

Despite the fact that it’s possible, I don’t view overturning Roe v Wade as likely. That’s because it’s not clear how many anti-Roe votes sit on the court. The three Democratic justices, along with John Roberts, are on record as pro-Roe. Justices Thomas, Alito, and Amy Coney Barrett are likely anti-Roe, but the positions of Kavanaugh and Gorsuch are not crystal clear. …


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Ever since Marx, leftism has defined itself as a movement by and for the “working class.” Yet, today, this paradigm is woefully inadequate, for several key reasons: first, class consciousness is less relevant than ever before, second, workers are not the most marginalized class of people, third, the working class no longer has the power it once did, and fourth, the very concept of the working class inadvertently supports a capitalist perspective on human value.

Class Consciousness

Leftists have traditionally tried to foment class consciousness. If workers could only see themselves as part of an oppressed majority, they might be encouraged to rebel, unionize, strike, or at the very least, “vote in their economic best interests.” …


After a New Hampshire win, Bernie faces new challenges

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Bernie’s New Hampshire win has solidified his status as the front runner. He’s won the most votes in the first two contests, and by all accounts, he’s on his way to another win in Nevada, where Joe Biden has apparently given up (he flew directly to South Carolina instead yesterday) and where Elizabeth Warren has canceled her ads.

Still, the win wasn’t quite as big as the polls predicted. And looking into the exit polls, there are some warning signs for Bernie going forward. …


In a democracy, the majority ought to rule. But too often, the system is designed to produce exactly the opposite outcome.

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It started when we drafted the constitution. The Senate gave each state an equal say, despite unequal populations, which has the effect of giving more power to smaller, whiter, and more conservative states.

In our original system, no voters could vote for President, not even white, landowning males. Instead, those voters could only vote for their state legislator, who in turn voted for an electoral college member, who met after the election to choose the President. That’s right, the electoral college was originally a deliberative body, with no obligation to follow anyone’s votes at all. …


The story of socialism vs. the establishment

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Before it was branded “Medicare for All,” the term for a truly universal, government-funded insurance plan was “single payer,” and the first serious attempt was in 1971, when Sen. Ted Kennedy introduced his health care plan. It would guarantee healthcare to all, funded by the government, paid for with an additional payroll tax.

He didn’t have a receptive audience in then President Richard Nixon, who said (in a taped, private conversation) “ I’m not too keen on any of these damn medical programs.”

John D. Ehrlichman replied that his idea was to expand a role for private HMOs. “ All the incentives are toward less medical care, because… the less care they give them, the more money they make.” …


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Thanks to over-reporting a few scary cases and an abundance of crime TV dramas, parents today are scared of criminals and “stranger danger.” But the reality shows a different danger should be occupying their minds: guns.

To get the numbers, let’s first ask, how many children are killed by kidnappers? According to the most recent statistics I could find, about 105 children are kidnapped by strangers in the USA per year. Of those, only 8 kids are killed. …


Beto O’Rourke’s new Health Care proposal is the worst of both worlds

Slate recently profiled newly announced Presidential candidate Beto O’Rouke’s evolution on health care. Having previously supported Bernie Sanders’ Medicare for all, he now says he supports “Medicare for America,” which Slate pitches as something of a compromise. And it is — if by, “compromise,” you mean taking the worst elements of our private system and combining it with the logistical hurdles involved in setting up Single Payer.

Here’s the basics: Medicare for America would expand Medicare to children and the currently uninsured. But businesses would have the option of paying into the system, or could continue to offer private plans to their employees. …


A Facebook debate that I just couldn’t let go.

“The media is the enemy of the people,” — Donald Trump. This quotation was recently posted in a Facebook group I was a member of, followed by a prompt to “Agree or disagree?”

I replied that, especially over the past two years, I have become aware of how much the media is dishonest. …


GOP dissidents and Never Trumpers yearn for a party that only existed in their imagination.

Kurt Bardella recently wrote an article titled “The Republican Party Keeps Convincing Me I Was Right To Leave It,” in which he bemoans how today’s GOP has become the party of Trump.

He’s not alone. Governor John Kasich, former McCain strategist Steve Schmidt, former Bush speechwriter David Frum, GOP activist David French, and many others have claimed that Trump has ruined the party. But that claim implies that there was something to good to ruin. To put it another way, was the GOP ever great?

The first thing Bardella complains about is how the GOP included an anti-pornography plank into its platform, yet it was willing to look the other way when it came to Trump’s own moral transgressions. …

Jared Plotkin

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